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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
would be seeing wall-to-wall coverage of one of the most exciting finishes to a presidential election in the television age. we are not going to see as much of that, certainly through the weekend. which means whichever candidate was going to befit more fr national coverage is going to lose paired to what it would have been like. >> rose: we conclude this evening, focusing on politics with nate silver, founder of "the new york times" blog 538.com. >> i mean ohio is a swing state for a reason, is that it resembles the united states, rural areas and suburban areas, you could certainly have a case where romney wins the popular vote by one point and obama wins ohio and iowa by one point that is possible, maybe a one or two-point shift but there is most no way to look at the historof tsounry or try to do the more complex things, the mathematical models unlikely to have romney win the popular and have him lose the electorial college. >> rose: the sites and sounds of hurricane sandy, mark halperin and nate silver when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additi
>> announcer: the following is a pbs election 2012 special presentation made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> narrator: tonight, it's the most expensive presidential campaign in american history. with a barrage of negative ads -- >> we can't afford four more years -- >> narration: and court battles over voter eligibility. finally, you get to choose. will either candidate's plan actually work? from the pbs newshour, frontline, washington week, and need to know, this is "election 2012: what's at stake." >> announcer: from the tisch wnet studios in new york, hari sreenivasan. >> thanks for joining us. tonight we are going to do something different. combining the resources of pbs's news and public affairs programs, we are going to look beyond election day and examine how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national de
political weekend before the election on tuesday, we talk with john dickerson the political director of cbs news. >>hio is still the granddaddy of them all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this qstio what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know wh
's devastation should compel all elected leaders to take immediate action. here to talk about the disaster's wide implications are three journalists their coverage of the disaster has called for vigilance in a world facing new and harsh challenges. joining me bryan walsh of "time" magazine. he writes the cover story lessons from the storm. paul barrett assistants managing editor and senior writer of bloomberg busineseek. his cover story is called it's global warming, stupid. and by phone steve coll of the new yorker magazine. i am pleased to have all of them here at this table. steve, this is what you have said. new yorkers like to tell stories about their extraordinary resilience. there's truth in these stories as we've seen in the past few days. the rescue and cooperation devastated communities. the absence of looting the well rehearsed emergency response protocols by many institutions and government. there is a collective sense of denial too about how poorly presented the city is for events of this scale. how poorly prepared have we been, steve? >> well, very, especially about flood waters. ir
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)